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Open Journal of Jungian Typology Posts

An Illustration of Te and Ti

By Sigurd Arild Two people observe the same occurrence and their consciousness drags them in different directions. Let us say they both observe their neighbor’s dog barking incessantly, disturbing their peace and making their lives miserable. One person’s consciousness would more naturally gravitate towards which possibilities of sanctioning the neighbor she had available and think about how she could the most effectively, and in the shortest time, achieve her goal of getting the dog to stop ruining her peace. Another person, by contrast, might observe the same phenomenon and (instead of thinking about how to realistically and cost-effectively solve the…

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On the Kantian Subject/Object Divide in Relation to Jung

By Michael Pierce Recent research on my part, mostly of Immanuel Kant and his considerable influence on psychology and Jung in particular, as well as a discussion with Boye Akinwande, has lent me a number of insights I would like to share in this article (and video). All of the functions are ultimately ‘subjective’ in the more traditional sense of being rooted in the subject. Extroverted functions, while striving to be ‘objective’ and therefore taking a different approach to interpreting stimuli, are not necessarily more ‘hooked into’ the true, outside world — the noumenal realm — than introverted functions. As Jung…

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Richard Noll’s ‘New Preface’ for ‘The Jung Cult’

ABSTRACT: Richard Noll is a historian of psychiatry who wrote two controversial volumes on C.G. Jung in the 1990s: The Jung Cult (1994) and The Aryan Christ (1997). A third volume, Mysteria, was also set for publication by Princeton University Press (1994/1995), but was suppressed at the behest of the Jung family. Noll has previously made his ‘New Preface’ to the paperback edition of The Jung Cult available to scholars through gated communities such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate. However, with the permission of the author, the ‘New Preface’ for ‘The Jung Cult’ (1997) is now made available in an ungated format for the first time. – OJJT.…

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Intuition and Sensation as Names and Misnomers

By Sigurd Arild As they are used in Jungian typology, the names of Intuition and Sensation are often confusing to the newcomer. Indeed, it is not just newcomers; even experts have at times been confounded by that choice of nomenclature. For example, as van der Hoop has said: “Jung’s definition, according to which intuition is the mental function which transmits perception in an unconscious way, I do not … regard as very useful. In the first place, intuition is not felt as perception, nor as a group of perceptions, but as an insight into the significance of the whole of the…

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C.G. Jung’s Secret Letter to Poul Bjerre

ABSTRACT: In 1913, while relations were souring with Sigmund Freud, C.G. Jung sent the following letter to the Swedish psychologist Poul Bjerre. The letter was sent shortly after Jung’s very last meeting with Freud (they were physically in the same room, but apparently did not speak to each other). The original letter is located in archives in Stockholm, Sweden. The letter is dated November 10, 1913. All emphases are in the original. – OJJT. By C.G. Jung Highly esteemed colleague! Thank you so much for the happy tidings. May I have your permission to announce the news in the Corr-blatt? I have less encouraging…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ISFP and ESFP

By John Barnes In this article I’ll continue my tour of the sister types and their tertiary functions, this time dealing with the ESFP and the ISFP types. In the ISFP Ni is tertiary. Ni, as I’ve seen it argued, can be understood in part as a focus on the subjective representation of an idea. Evidence of this kind of heuristic can be seen in types with more differentiated Ni, e.g., Plato’s theory of forms and Martin Luther King Jr.’s use of vivid symbolism in his speeches. The ISFP brings the symbolic representative nature of Ni into union with Fi and…

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Manifestations of the Inferior Function, Part 2: Sensation and Intuition

By Luke Whincop ABSTRACT: This article, as the second of a two part series, details how the perceiving functions, Si, Se, Ni and Ne, appear in their repressed, unconscious forms. Inferior Introverted Perception Overall, inferior introverted perception refers to a lack of perception of the inner world, where either subjective real-time experiences or introspective musings and associations are pushed aside, in favor of external perceptions and ideas in the outer world. Inferior Introverted Sensation (Si) When Si is repressed, Ne is subsequently most dominant. Since Ne is always looking for new possibilities and untested ideas, moving from the one to the…

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Manifestations of the Inferior Function, Part 1: Thinking and Feeling

By Luke Whincop ABSTRACT: This article, as the first of a two part series, details how the judging functions, Ti, Te, Fi and Fe, appear in their repressed, unconscious forms. Inferior Introverted Judgement (Inferior Ti and Fi): Overall, inferior introverted judgement refers to a lack of internal control, where either subjective logical principles or emotional values are pushed aside, in favor of external organisation and control in the outer world. Introverted Thinking (Ti) When Ti is repressed, Fe is subsequently most dominant. Thus, principles like truth and justice are pushed aside, and are seen to be not as important as…

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Intellectual S Types

By Eva Gregersen As previously detailed in CelebrityTypes’ article on the bias against sensation, there is a bias in the field of Jungian typology that has become so pervasive that the divide between Sensation and Intuition has become the amateur’s code speak for fleshing out differences in IQ and cognitive ability, rather than actually having to do with the cognitive functions. As Ryan Smith and I have previously quoted Horace Gray, M.D., to say: “… in general intelligent people hold that creative imagination, whether in art, literature, mathematics, music or science, is more apt to be found in people who perceive the world by…

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Exposition of Jung’s Categories of Judgement and Perception

By Michael Pierce In past videos and articles, I have mentioned briefly such terms as ‘introverted perceiving’ and ‘extroverted judging’. In this article (and video) I would like to expand on these concepts, because I have found them extremely useful for understanding the nature of the functions and how they tend to manifest in consciousness. Let me first review some of the terms: I am working with the approach to E/I which focuses on the subjective abstraction of introversion and the objective affirmation of extroversion, as discussed in my previous article (and video). I am also working with my usual conception…

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