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Open Journal of Jungian Typology Posts

Jung on Nietzsche

By C.G. Jung You know, Nietzsche in the first part of his life was a great and very intuitive intellectual, chiefly rebellious and critical of traditional values, and you still find that in Zarathustra. There was then little of what one would call positive in him; he could criticize with remarkable readiness, but he was not yet synthetic or constructive, and he could not produce values. Then suddenly, like an extraordinary revelation, all which his former writings omitted came upon him. He was born in 1844, and he began to write Zarathustra in 1883, so he was then thirtynine years…

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Elucidating the interactions between thinking and intuition in INFJs and INTJs

By Lee Morgan INFJ: (1a) The logical structure comes first. (Ti) INTJ: (1b) The logical idea comes first. (Te) INFJ: (2a) Logical structure restricts propositions. What can be said is known a priori. (Ti) INTJ: (2b) Logical ideas restricts propositions. What can be said is known a posteriori. (Te) INFJ: (3a) The proposition, “Number ran, statically,” is logical, but senseless. (Ti) INTJ: (3b) The proposition, “Number ran, statically,” has a sense, but is illogical. (Te) INFJ: (4a) Complex ideas emerge from the holistic layering of immiscible, but parallel, logical categories. The number of parallel logical categories is unknowable. For example,…

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The Facts of Personality – In Tribute to Ludwig Wittgenstein

By Lee Morgan (1)    The functional atom is the simple object. Its form is shown and its temperament is said. (2)    The function is the logical category. It contains the simple objects. (3)    That the functional atom is paired with its opposite is the logical structure. (4)    By opposite, I mean those functional atoms that show the same form but speak in different senses. The logical category is the sense. (5)    The function axis is the complex idea. (6)    The form of the function axis contains the form of its parts. The function axis is silent. (7)    The function axis…

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Introduction to Function Axes

Watch this article as two videos here and here.  By Michael Pierce The Judgement Axes In general, the nature of the judging axes can be described in this way: Fe/Ti asks ‘what do you think, and how can we communicate that?’ Te/Fi asks ‘what do you want, and how can we get it?’ These two attitudes can be summed up as ‘translating’ and ‘operationalizing’ respectively. The one axis seeks to understand the logical form or structure (Ti) underlying various sentimental appearances (Fe); thinking along this axis is a bit like trying to construct an android, a structure of programming and framework…

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Why Peter Thiel Might Be INTP

By Hannah Strachan Most people in the typology world seem to type Thiel as some kind of TJ type – INTJ, ENTJ, or ISTJ. However, I believe he is none of those types. In fact, I believe he is INTP. I will offer some pointer to that effect below. Why Thiel shows Ti over Te 1. His “favorite interview question” of asking people what they think is true, but what other people disagree with you on is very Ti. In effect, it’s a seeking of interesting new theories and shows an inherent lack of reverence towards accepted models. Te dominants would probably…

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Process Vs. Orientation: A Local Formulation of Typology

By Sam Levey What is a function? As functions are the core of typology, you might think this would be a very straightforward question, but actually it is not. In Psychological Types, Jung defined a function as “a particular form of psychic activity that remains the same in principle under varying conditions,” but this isn’t particularly satisfactory. Besides that this could refer to pretty much anything or nothing depending on your definitions of “same” and “varying conditions,” it’s also just so vague as to be unhelpful for developing understanding. How about later sources? Von Franz does not appear to offer…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ENTJ and INTJ

By John Barnes This article is a continuation of a series of articles in which I distinguish the sister types through their differing tertiary functions. Fi focuses on the personal values of the subject. This gives types with differentiated Fi an attitude of individuation of their own values and invocation to let others express their own, equally valid values. For example of this upholding of everyone’s personal validity, there’s the INFP Jane Goodall’s claims that “Every individual matters” and that “Every individual has a role to play”. In the ENTJ Fi is repressed and so instead of a focus on…

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Why Larry Ellison Is ENTJ

By James Fisher Both Keirsey and CelebrityTypes have assessed Larry Ellison to be an Se type. Keirsey ESTP; CelebrityTypes ESFP. On the face of it, these claims are understandable: Ellison’s public image is that of a big playboy, a stereotypical ‘SP’ male according to Keirsey’s portraiture of those types. However, if one looks past the marketing, it will be seen that Ellison has an incredible amount of drive and determinism. He’s known to be ruthless and harsh, and in the way he talks, you can detect a preoccupation with ‘serious’ matters – far moreso than the energy expended on the playboy…

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Richard Noll’s 1992-1994 Letters to Sonu Shamdasani

ABSTRACT: Richard Noll is a historian of psychiatry who wrote two controversial volumes on C.G. Jung in the 1990s: The Jung Cult (1994) and The Aryan Christ (1997). A third volume, Mysteria, was also set for publication by Princeton University Press (1994/1995), but was suppressed at the behest of the Jung family. Sonu Shamdasani is a historian of psychiatry in the employ of the Jung family, responsible for editing, among other things, Jung’s ‘The Red Book.’ As detailed here, the two are mostly known as rivals, but as documents posited by Noll in the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology in Akron, Ohio…

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A Counterperspective to Arild’s Conception of Te and Ti

By Sam Levey Concerning Sigurd Arild’s piece, An Illustration of Te and Ti, although I think the characterization of Te is quite accurate, I actually think that the description of Ti misses the mark a bit. As I see it, Thinking concerns itself with the mechanical attributes of a thing, while Feeling concerns itself with its value attributes. So, while Thinking might determine how something works or how to accomplish a task, Feeling makes the determination of whether a task is good to do, or whether you should accomplish a task (with appropriate caveats that word choice and context matter a lot…

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