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Category: John Barnes

ESTJ vs. ISTJ

By John Barnes “Any religion that endorses violence is incapable of delivering spiritual enlightenment. How obvious does that have to be. And it has no right even to call itself a religion. Without the shield of religion to hide behind, Islam would be banned in the civilized world as a political ideology of hate. And we have no obligations to make allowances for it any more than we do for Nazism. It’s a bigger threat to our freedom than Nazism ever was.” -Pat Condell on Islam. Some might be tempted to type the speaker of the above quote as a…

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ENFJ vs. INFJ

By John Barnes The following quotes are an exchange between Neil Degrasse Tyson and Richard Dawkins on being public intellectuals. Tyson to Dawkins: “You’re a professor of the public understanding of science. Not professor of delivering truth to the public. And these are two different exercises. One of them is you put the truth out there and like you said they either buy your book or they don’t. Well that’s not being an educator. That’s just putting it out there. Being an educator is part not only getting the truth right, but there’s got to be an act of persuasion…

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Why David Foster Wallace is ENTP

By John Barnes In his many interviews Wallace comes off as sensitive, caring, and self-conscious about being self-conscious. These seem like stereotypical traits of an introvert, especially an intuitive introvert like Elon Musk or Richard Ayoade. It’s surprising to people (and to me initially) to see that CelebrityTypes has Wallace under ENTP. One of the complaints against this typing is that it doesn’t take into account the usefulness of certain stereotypes about ENTPs, e.g., ENTPs aren’t shrinking violets. The first part of this essay will be a counter-stereotype that breaks the perception of Wallace as an effete artist and supports…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ESFJ and ISFJ

 By John Barnes When a type has conscious use of Ne, the type often has an ease of expressing multiple ideas; hence, the abundance of NTP and NFP poets, playwrights, and authors. And the obverse is true. When a type represses Ne, the type will have difficulty expressing multiple ideas and the type will have conscious use of Si. When Si is dominant the type will place value and pay attention to sense-impressions. These sense-impressions are infamously difficult to articulate, one of the reasons ISJs can appear very stoic to those who don’t know them well. So ISFJs and ISTJs…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ENTJ and INTJ

By John Barnes This article is a continuation of a series of articles in which I distinguish the sister types through their differing tertiary functions. Fi focuses on the personal values of the subject. This gives types with differentiated Fi an attitude of individuation of their own values and invocation to let others express their own, equally valid values. For example of this upholding of everyone’s personal validity, there’s the INFP Jane Goodall’s claims that “Every individual matters” and that “Every individual has a role to play”. In the ENTJ Fi is repressed and so instead of a focus on…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ISFP and ESFP

By John Barnes In this article I’ll continue my tour of the sister types and their tertiary functions, this time dealing with the ESFP and the ISFP types. In the ISFP Ni is tertiary. Ni, as I’ve seen it argued, can be understood in part as a focus on the subjective representation of an idea. Evidence of this kind of heuristic can be seen in types with more differentiated Ni, e.g., Plato’s theory of forms and Martin Luther King Jr.’s use of vivid symbolism in his speeches. The ISFP brings the symbolic representative nature of Ni into union with Fi and…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ENFP and INFP

By John Barnes In the last article we discussed how Ni and Fe sets apart the sister types ESTP and ISTP. This time we’ll move onto Si and Te in the ENFP and INFP. As I’ve said before in the article discussing the ENTP and INTP, I define Si as a sort of codifying heuristic. In the ENFP Si is repressed. Of course in common everyday language ENFPs don’t typically use the word codified. Instead they use words like alive and dead to describe relationships, ideas, and projects. I understand these words as being synonymous with codification. When an idea…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ESTP and ISTP

By John Barnes Last article we discussed the idea that the tertiary function sets apart sister types. We saw this in action with the two NTP’s tertiary functions, Fe and Si. Now we’ll see the same principle with the two STP types’ tertiary functions Fe and Ni. Fe is repressed in the ISTP. In the INTP this repression combined with their Ne/Si axis gives them (to quote Theodore Millon) an eccentric and intellectual expression and an alienated self-image. In the ISTP because of their Se/Ni axis their repressed Fe manifests as a more intense and direct “no-bullshit” approach to life.…

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Differentiating the Types via the Tertiary Function: ENTP and INTP

By John Barnes The orientation of the tertiary function has been hotly debated (even Myers did not finally settle on one orientation), but for the sake of simplicity I will be using the Standard Model. So the tertiary function is extroverted if the dominant function is extroverted. Hence according to the Standard Model, an ENTP has Ne, Ti, Fe, Si. Starting with John Beebe’s association of the tertiary function with the Child Archetype, the tertiary function has become known as the puerile function. I think this is a fair assessment but I prefer to think of the tertiary function as that which…

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