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Open Journal of Jungian Typology Posts

Why Ayn Rand is INFJ (Socionics)

By Mal Enor It is commonly thought that Rand was an INTJ. After all, even her closest followers called her Mrs. Logic. Unfortunately, I don’t see logic as being necessarily associated with a particular type. Developing a philosophical system is not relevant to the INTJ type. I have read two biographies of Ayn Rand and most of her books. So my evidence comes from reading about Rand. All quoted material below comes from Socionics Types: IEI-INFp to whom I am thankful for this helpful material. Note: INFp in Socionics is functionally equivalent to the classic INFJ type in the MBTI. “[T]hey…

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Introduction To Typology

By Ştefan Boros Not everyone approaches the world in the same way. While every individual is special in their own way and while everyone has their own unique gifts and flaws, people can be classified into 16 different personality types. Each personality type has a certain number of traits that will be present in everyone having that personality type. For example, if you take 10 people each of different personality types they might vary greatly in their traits and temperament but if you take 10 people each of the same personality type you’ll find out that, while having a good number…

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Socionics Descriptions of the Functions (with Examples)

By Kartikeya Chauhan 1.Fi : Relation (R). Static, deals with the field of psychological distance. Awareness of the ratio of state of energy (interpersonal), like the ratio of my emotional energy to yours. This awareness is used to fine-tune the wavelength of two different persons (w.r.t. the internal state) to bridge psychological distances (eg. through Politeness or avoiding saying something necessary). Hyper aware of its own emotional state because it has so many other emotional states to contrast with, one by one, either by looking at what’s present and dealing with that (INFP) or with what is absent (ISFP), from which…

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Re: Adam Grant on Sex Differences and the MBTI

Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist and Wharton professor. With regards to the Myers-Briggs personality test, Grant wrote a debunking piece on that test in 2013, which spawned numerous other articles that criticized the Myers-Briggs. With regards to sex differences, in 2017 a Google software engineer James Damore wrote a piece arguing that the reason there are more men than women in tech jobs is not simply due to culture and discrimination, but that biological sex differences play some role as well. Grant has also written a reply to that piece, which went viral after it was shared by the…

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Criticism of CT’s Take on INTJs

By Miguel Barragan When looking at the tests’ verbal structure, it always points out the INTJ’s self assertion and self reference, and even their humor is labeled as ‘self-referential’. I don’t think INTJ’s are as full of themselves as your site points them out to be; could we get a closer look towards Ni, Ti types and Ti, Ni types? (INTJ and INTP, respectively, simply following another model). I think Ni and Ti are so similar, there are people who use them as their dominant functions, but they don’t act like ISTP’s or INFJ’s (I know that following your model, the…

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My Take on the Classical Buddhist Problem

By Lee Morgan CelebrityTypes have published Four Takes on a Classical Buddhist Problem. Here’s my read of it – or this is my reading of Nagarjuna at least: it’s all about attitude or perspective, i.e. as in the two perspectives in Parmenides – the one and the many. If you reify yourself as an “I”, you’re effectively trying to step into “the river.” But you can’t step into the river, because “you can’t step into the same river once.” The “I” is eternal flux itself. If there were an “I” at all, it would constantly be dying and being reincarnated. In…

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Dominant Sensing as deductive, Dominant Intuition as inductive

By Kartikeya Chauhan 1. This may seem contradictory to the whole notion of Perception which withholds making judgements or organising information in addition to the common notion of Ti=deductive and Te=inductive but here, the focus is not on the organisation of perceived data (Judging) but the mode of perception itself by means of deduction and induction. 1.1. Since Perception is irrational, induction and deduction here do not seek to make sense of the Perceived data but only describe the method of flow of that data between Sensing and Intuition (or vice versa) without being affected or organised by the Rational processes (T/F). 2.0. Dominant…

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Why Gal Gadot Might Be INTJ

By John Stevens I disagree with CelebrityTypes’ typing of Gal Gadot as an ESFJ. I think she’s INTJ. I have read her quotes, read her Wiki entry, saw a lot of her interviews. I just want you to take my impression in for consideration. At her W interview, pay attention to her story from 0:35 to 1:41 when she’s describing how she didn’t want to take the beauty pageant contest seriously. It’s Ni-Te. An Fe dom would at least be polite in how they don’t want to take part in the beauty pageant. In her case, she’s very sarcastic and blunt…

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Type and Opinion

By Lee Morgan Part One: Wittgenstein; Or, the Platonist Positivists argue that all truths are verifiable through scientific experimentation, or mathematical deduction. The philosophy of positivism is best expressed today among the so-called New Atheists. Writers like Sam Harris[1] argue that the scientific method alone can establish truthfulness. Such hardline reductionism has sparked controversy among academic philosophers like Roger Scruton[2]. Thinkers like Scruton criticize positivism for denying the possibility of the sacred. While Scruton agrees that the sacred is immeasurable, he still asserts its truthfulness. Moreover, he argues that positivism denies what is essential to a meaningful life. That being…

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On Hume and Social Justice

By Lee Morgan In recent years, few issues have been as polarizing as that concerning racism. And understandably so. The world has a dark past and our fathers’ trauma has long drawn its traces in eternity. Of course, I have no means of resolving the discussion, nor do I offer much in the way of consolation. What follows is but my attempt to clarify ideas, and should in no way be understood as a repudiation of the feelings associated with them. Part One: Institutional Racism Is institutional racism separable from the liberal conception of government? Assuming first that the two…

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